Best Lawyers for Military Law in America

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Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2022
  • Location:
    Lincoln, Nebraska
  • Practice Areas:
    Military Law Criminal Defense: General Practice DUI / DWI Defense Criminal Defense: White-Collar
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2017
  • Location:
    Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • Practice Areas:
    Professional Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs Military Law Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs Product Liability Litigation - Plaintiffs Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2021
  • Location:
    Columbia, South Carolina
  • Practice Areas:
    Criminal Defense: White-Collar Medical Malpractice Law Military Law Qui Tam Law Personal Injury Litigation Commercial Litigation Criminal Defense: General Practice
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2013
  • Location:
    Dayton, Ohio
  • Practice Areas:
    Military Law Criminal Defense: General Practice Criminal Defense: White-Collar
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2006
  • Location:
    New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Practice Areas:
    Admiralty and Maritime Law Personal Injury Litigation Immigration Law Professional Malpractice Law Gaming Law Technology Law Criminal Defense: White-Collar Media Law Biotechnology and Life Sciences Practice Elder Law Venture Capital Law Military Law Mediation International Arbitration - Governmental CleanTech Law Employment Law - Management Workers' Compensation Law - Claimants Family Law Natural Resources Law Trusts and Estates International Trade and Finance Law Collaborative Law: Family Law International Arbitration - Commercial Litigation - Intellectual Property Litigation - Mergers and Acquisitions Labor Law - Union Workers' Compensation Law - Employers Legal Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs Professional Malpractice Law - Defendants Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law Energy Law Education Law Public Finance Law Commercial Litigation Government Relations Practice Mass Tort Litigation Product Liability Litigation Administrative / Regulatory Law Transportation Law Commercial Finance Law Litigation - Real Estate Litigation - Land Use and Zoning Entertainment Law - Music Trademark Law Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs Environmental Law Franchise Law Health Care Law Construction Law Antitrust Law Private Funds / Hedge Funds Law Equipment Finance Law FDA Law Nonprofit / Charities Law Municipal Law Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law Aviation Law Utilities Law Litigation - Labor and Employment Entertainment Law - Motion Pictures and Television Patent Law Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions - Plaintiffs Leisure and Hospitality Law Project Finance Law Communications Law Advertising Law Mining Law Water Law Electronic Discovery and Information Management Law Economic Development Law Financial Services Regulation Law Corporate Compliance Law Litigation - Banking and Finance Litigation - Construction IT Outsourcing Law Labor Law - Management Legal Malpractice Law - Defendants Sports Law Civil Rights Law Insurance Law Leveraged Buyouts and Private Equity Law Bet-the-Company Litigation Medical Malpractice Law Timber Law Securities Regulation Closely Held Companies and Family Businesses Law Commercial Transactions / UCC Law Litigation - Trusts and Estates Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions - Defendants Product Liability Litigation - Plaintiffs First Amendment Law Real Estate Law Mergers and Acquisitions Law Securitization and Structured Finance Law Appellate Practice Criminal Defense: General Practice Mutual Funds Law Banking and Finance Law Native American Law Family Law Mediation Oil and Gas Law DUI / DWI Defense Ethics and Professional Responsibility Law Business Organizations (including LLCs and Partnerships) Corporate Governance Law Arbitration Litigation - First Amendment Litigation - Patent Litigation - Municipal Privacy and Data Security Law Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs Product Liability Litigation - Defendants Railroad Law Information Technology Law Derivatives and Futures Law Securities / Capital Markets Law Land Use and Zoning Law Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law Collaborative Law: Civil Food and Beverage Law Litigation - Securities Litigation - ERISA Litigation - Regulatory Enforcement (SEC, Telecom, Energy) Litigation - Antitrust Litigation - Bankruptcy Litigation - Environmental Copyright Law Employment Law - Individuals
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2020
  • Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
  • Practice Areas:
    Military Law Litigation - Construction Construction Law Trade Secrets Law Civil Rights Law Commercial Litigation Litigation - Municipal Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2007
  • Location:
    New York, New York
  • Practice Areas:
    Commercial Litigation Litigation - Intellectual Property Military Law
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2022
  • Location:
    St. Louis, Missouri
  • Practice Areas:
    Military Law Criminal Defense: General Practice Criminal Defense: White-Collar
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2019
  • Location:
    Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Practice Areas:
    Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants Municipal Law Military Law Litigation - Insurance Commercial Litigation Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs

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  • Location:
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Recognition by Best Lawyers is based entirely on peer review. Our methodology is designed to capture, as accurately as possible, the consensus opinion of leading lawyers about the professional abilities of their colleagues within the same geographical area and legal practice area.

Best Lawyers employs a sophisticated, conscientious, rational, and transparent survey process designed to elicit meaningful and substantive evaluations of the quality of legal services. Our belief has always been that the quality of a peer review survey is directly related to the quality of the voters.

Practice Area Definition

Military Law Definition

Military law includes the various statutes and regulations that provide guidance to active duty members of the U.S. armed forces, members of the National Guard or Reserves, veterans, Department of Defense civilian employees, and military dependents. Given how there are significant differences between the civilian and military sectors, special laws are needed to support military disciplinary actions, the welfare of its members and dependents, the rules associated with warfare, and the bureaucracy associated with modern military preparedness.

Military law largely revolves around the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), which provides the framework for the military criminal justice process. While closely mirroring criminal laws associated with civilian legal codes, the UCMJ also includes uniquely military crimes such as adultery, the willful disobedience of a superior commissioned officer, and desertion.

Criminal actions are prosecuted in courts-martial, which operate under special rules established in the UCMJ. Unlike the civilian sector, where members of the general public serve as jurors at trials, the military trier of fact can consist of a panel of service members. Under Article 15 of the UCMJ, minor military offenses can be handled through administrative proceedings called non-judicial punishment. The military provides service members facing disciplinary actions an appointed military defense counsel. However, the accused may also retain a civilian attorney at their own expense.  

Civilian attorneys can also represent service members in a variety of administrative proceedings, such as medical evaluation boards, separation boards, discharge review boards, and boards for correction of military or naval records. The boards play an important role in governing the statutory rights of service members, veterans, and their dependents by ruling on issues involving important entitlements and benefits.  

Military law also covers the unique civilian employment rights that are extended to service members and veterans. The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA), for example, protects service members against discrimination based on their military service and the Veterans Employment Opportunity Act (VEOA) provides certain veterans with preference rights in federal hiring. Additionally, civil protections are provided by laws such as the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA).  

Military law also encompasses the important veterans’ retirement and disability benefits statutes that are administered by U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; the military-related legal issues that service members or their dependents face in family law actions; and the disenrollment of Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and military academy cadets.  

Tully Rinckey PLLC

Tully Rinckey PLLC logo

Military law includes the various statutes and regulations that provide guidance to active duty members of the U.S. armed forces, members of the National Guard or Reserves, veterans, Department of Defense civilian employees, and military dependents. Given how there are significant differences between the civilian and military sectors, special laws are needed to support military disciplinary actions, the welfare of its members and dependents, the rules associated with warfare, and the bureaucracy associated with modern military preparedness.

Military law largely revolves around the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), which provides the framework for the military criminal justice process. While closely mirroring criminal laws associated with civilian legal codes, the UCMJ also includes uniquely military crimes such as adultery, the willful disobedience of a superior commissioned officer, and desertion.

Criminal actions are prosecuted in courts-martial, which operate under special rules established in the UCMJ. Unlike the civilian sector, where members of the general public serve as jurors at trials, the military trier of fact can consist of a panel of service members. Under Article 15 of the UCMJ, minor military offenses can be handled through administrative proceedings called non-judicial punishment. The military provides service members facing disciplinary actions an appointed military defense counsel. However, the accused may also retain a civilian attorney at their own expense.  

Civilian attorneys can also represent service members in a variety of administrative proceedings, such as medical evaluation boards, separation boards, discharge review boards, and boards for correction of military or naval records. The boards play an important role in governing the statutory rights of service members, veterans, and their dependents by ruling on issues involving important entitlements and benefits.  

Military law also covers the unique civilian employment rights that are extended to service members and veterans. The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA), for example, protects service members against discrimination based on their military service and the Veterans Employment Opportunity Act (VEOA) provides certain veterans with preference rights in federal hiring. Additionally, civil protections are provided by laws such as the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA).  

Military law also encompasses the important veterans’ retirement and disability benefits statutes that are administered by U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; the military-related legal issues that service members or their dependents face in family law actions; and the disenrollment of Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and military academy cadets.