Best Lawyers for CleanTech Law in America

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Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2013
  • Location:
    Bellevue, Washington
  • Practice Areas:
    Energy Regulatory Law Oil and Gas Law Energy Law CleanTech Law
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2015
  • Location:
    Seattle, Washington
  • Practice Areas:
    CleanTech Law Patent Law
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2012
  • Location:
    Portland, Oregon
  • Practice Areas:
    Venture Capital Law Securities / Capital Markets Law Mergers and Acquisitions Law Corporate Law CleanTech Law
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2003
  • Location:
    Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Practice Areas:
    Environmental Law Energy Law CleanTech Law Government Contracts Litigation - Environmental
Lawyer
  • Recognized Since: 2016
  • Location:
    San Diego, California
  • Practice Areas:
    CleanTech Law

  • Recognized Since: Ones to Watch Since:
  • Location:
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Recognition by Best Lawyers is based entirely on peer review. Our methodology is designed to capture, as accurately as possible, the consensus opinion of leading lawyers about the professional abilities of their colleagues within the same geographical area and legal practice area.

Best Lawyers employs a sophisticated, conscientious, rational, and transparent survey process designed to elicit meaningful and substantive evaluations of the quality of legal services. Our belief has always been that the quality of a peer review survey is directly related to the quality of the voters.

Practice Area Definition

CleanTech Law Definition

“Clean Tech” is an abbreviation for the phrase “clean technology.” Clean tech industries feature a diverse range of products, services and processes, typically, for developing, commercializing, and regulating the natural environment. A simpler and perhaps more illustrative way to think of the industry is that it tends to cover issues which involve one or more of the classical elements — earth, air, fire, or water. 

For example, clean tech would include understanding and applying regulations for harvesting natural resources from the Athabasca oil sands in Alberta, Canada. It would also cover a development agreement for genomic research to produce biochemicals and biofuels to be used under the applicable European laws. 

The transactional side includes traditional areas such as financing, technology licensing and transfers, intellectual property strategy and protection, regulatory compliance, sustainable company policies and charter documents, product sourcing and distribution deals, tax and other incentives for energy and green projects, and monetization of carbon offsets, to name a few. The dispute resolution side includes environmental and scientific policy debates and the related legislative process, administrative hearings, mediation, arbitration, and, of course, litigation.

Lane Powell PC

Lane Powell PC logo

“Clean Tech” is an abbreviation for the phrase “clean technology.” Clean tech industries feature a diverse range of products, services and processes, typically, for developing, commercializing, and regulating the natural environment. A simpler and perhaps more illustrative way to think of the industry is that it tends to cover issues which involve one or more of the classical elements — earth, air, fire, or water. 

For example, clean tech would include understanding and applying regulations for harvesting natural resources from the Athabasca oil sands in Alberta, Canada. It would also cover a development agreement for genomic research to produce biochemicals and biofuels to be used under the applicable European laws. 

The transactional side includes traditional areas such as financing, technology licensing and transfers, intellectual property strategy and protection, regulatory compliance, sustainable company policies and charter documents, product sourcing and distribution deals, tax and other incentives for energy and green projects, and monetization of carbon offsets, to name a few. The dispute resolution side includes environmental and scientific policy debates and the related legislative process, administrative hearings, mediation, arbitration, and, of course, litigation.