Best Lawyers for Private Equity Law in Russia

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Practice Area Definition

Private Equity Law Definition

Private equity lawyers in Russia are involved in assisting their clients, typically private equity funds, in structuring and implementing private equity transactions – often the acquisition of equity in a private company. Private equity transactions may involve not a simple acquisition of equity, but different classes of shares, debt, and/or convertible instruments. 

Typically, investee companies on private equity transactions in Russia are relatively young companies, with limited sales and a high potential for growth. Although usually the founder-shareholders will retain a significant equity stake and directorship role(s), the private equity investor(s) will gain significant control over key company decisions, through their shareholding and through their representative(s) on the board of directors.
The private equity investor(s) want to retain the founder-shareholders, and to incentivize them (e.g. through share options, or bonuses based upon meeting key performance indicators). 

Private equity transactions in Russia usually involve a number of parties, for example, one or more private equity funds (typically structured outside of Russia) and a Russian investee company with multiple founder shareholders. 

The role of a private equity lawyer is not only to assist their client with the investment, but to advise on the ongoing relationship between the relevant stakeholders. 

Accordingly, the private equity lawyer would advise its clients on the following key areas:

The creation of different classes of shares, including preference shares.
The terms on which equity is created, issued, and/or transferred.
Warranties or other covenants given by the founder-shareholders in relation to the current business.
Non-compete restrictions on founder-shareholders.
Negotiating a shareholders’ agreement.
Amendments to the articles of association or charter.
Roles, rights, and restrictions on the power and authority of directors.
Veto rights for key minority shareholders.
Anticipated exit options.
Share Options and/or other incentive schemes.
Shareholder and third party financing.
Options, warrants, bonds, and/or other convertible instruments and quasi-equity.

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP logo

Private equity lawyers in Russia are involved in assisting their clients, typically private equity funds, in structuring and implementing private equity transactions – often the acquisition of equity in a private company. Private equity transactions may involve not a simple acquisition of equity, but different classes of shares, debt, and/or convertible instruments. 

Typically, investee companies on private equity transactions in Russia are relatively young companies, with limited sales and a high potential for growth. Although usually the founder-shareholders will retain a significant equity stake and directorship role(s), the private equity investor(s) will gain significant control over key company decisions, through their shareholding and through their representative(s) on the board of directors.
The private equity investor(s) want to retain the founder-shareholders, and to incentivize them (e.g. through share options, or bonuses based upon meeting key performance indicators). 

Private equity transactions in Russia usually involve a number of parties, for example, one or more private equity funds (typically structured outside of Russia) and a Russian investee company with multiple founder shareholders. 

The role of a private equity lawyer is not only to assist their client with the investment, but to advise on the ongoing relationship between the relevant stakeholders. 

Accordingly, the private equity lawyer would advise its clients on the following key areas:

The creation of different classes of shares, including preference shares.
The terms on which equity is created, issued, and/or transferred.
Warranties or other covenants given by the founder-shareholders in relation to the current business.
Non-compete restrictions on founder-shareholders.
Negotiating a shareholders’ agreement.
Amendments to the articles of association or charter.
Roles, rights, and restrictions on the power and authority of directors.
Veto rights for key minority shareholders.
Anticipated exit options.
Share Options and/or other incentive schemes.
Shareholder and third party financing.
Options, warrants, bonds, and/or other convertible instruments and quasi-equity.